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SATELLITE NEWS

NASA TELEVISION TO AIR LAUNCH OF NEXT INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION CREW NASA TELEVISION TO AIR LAUNCH OF NEXT INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION CREW - The next three crew members bound for the International Space Station are set to launch to the orbital outpost Wednesday, Sept. 2. NASA Television launch coverage will begin at 11:45 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, Sept. 1. Sergei Volkov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), Andreas Mogensen of ESA (European Space Agency) and Aidyn Aimbetov of the Kazakh Space Agency will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 12:37 a.m. Wednesday (10:34 a.m. Baikonur time). Mogensen and Aimbetov are short duration crew members while Volkov will spend six months on the orbital complex. The trio will travel in a Soyuz spacecraft, which will rendezvous with the space station and dock two days later to the Poisk module at 3:42 a.m. on Friday, Sept. 4. NASA TV coverage of docking will begin at 3 a.m.   More
(Source: PR Newswire - Aug 27)


LAUNCH DATE SET FOR AMSAT FOX-1A LAUNCH DATE SET FOR AMSAT FOX-1A - Vice President of Engineering Jerry Buxton, N0JY, has announced that the Fox-1A CubeSat will launch on October 8 from California. It initially had been set to launch in August. Fox-1A will include an FM transponder with an uplink frequency of 435.180 MHz, and a downlink frequency of 145.980 MHz. The first phase of the Fox series 1-Unit CubeSats will allow simple ground stations using hand-held transceiver and simple dual-band antennas to make contacts.    More
(Source: ARRL - Aug 26)


BOOZE MAKES ITS WAY TO INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION BOOZE MAKES ITS WAY TO INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION - A Japanese liquor company is boldly going where no distiller has gone before: outer space. A case of the hard stuff was part of Japan's 10-thousand pound cargo shipment that arrived Monday to the International Space Station. But it's not for any party. Suntory, the Japanese spirits company that owns whiskey brands Jim Beam and Maker's Mark, want to find out if the alcohol aging process occurs faster in space. The stash will be stored on the Space Station for a year and later brought back to Earth for comparison to its ‘earthling' brand.   More
(Source: WGNO - Aug 26)


JAPANESE HTV SUPPLY CARRIER REACHES SPACE STATION JAPANESE HTV SUPPLY CARRIER REACHES SPACE STATION - Japan's fifth HTV cargo freighter completed a five-day flight to the International Space Station on Wednesday, making a glacial laser-guided approach to the complex with a 9,500-pound package of food, spare parts and experiments. The experiments are devoted to studying how the human body changes in space, a prime objective of NASA astronaut Scott Kelly's nearly one-year stay aboard the outpost. Other investigations delivered by the H-2 Transfer Vehicle include a cosmic ray telescope designed to probe exotic dark matter in the universe and a commercially-funded experiment devised to examine how Japanese spirits age in zero gravity. Astronauts will not consume the samples, which were provided by Japanese distiller Suntory, but the spirits will be stored aboard the space station and returned to Earth for analysis.   More
(Source: SpaceFlight Now - Aug 25)


INMARSAT AWAITS SATELLITE LAUNCH THAT IS HOPED WILL SEND REVENUES ROCKETING INMARSAT AWAITS SATELLITE LAUNCH THAT IS HOPED WILL SEND REVENUES ROCKETING - Inmarsat will launch its third Global Xpress satellite on Friday, completing a network that the company hopes will deliver a $500m (£320m) boost to its annual revenues by 2020. Due to blast off aboard a Proton rocket from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 12.44pm UK time on Friday, the F3 satellite will mean communications group Inmarsat's Global Xpress (GX) network will have global coverage. As well as bringing high speed data to even the most remote regions, it paves the way to internet connectivity on flights worldwide.    More
(Source: Telegraph.co.uk - Aug 24)


RUSSIA'S SPACE PROGRAM IN CRISIS AFTER DECADES OF BRAIN DRAIN, NEGLECT RUSSIA'S SPACE PROGRAM IN CRISIS AFTER DECADES OF BRAIN DRAIN, NEGLECT - It might be the only country that can rocket humans into space, but Russia's once-great space program is being dragged back to Earth by decades of brain drain and financial hardship. "The Russian space industry is in an obvious state of crisis," said Asif Siddiqi, a professor at Fordham University in New York and an expert on Russia's space program. The latest sign that that the Kremlin's space program was creaking came on May 7, when a Progress M-27M unmanned spacecraft burned on re-entry over the Pacific. The incident put the International Space Station (ISS) at risk of being cut-off from Earth. The failure was not the worst in recent years: Russia has lost 15 spacecraft since 2010, with assembly mistakes blamed in most cases.    More
(Source: NBC News - Aug 24)


NASA TO BUILD HURRICANE-PROBING MICRO-SATELLITE FLEET NASA TO BUILD HURRICANE-PROBING MICRO-SATELLITE FLEET - When Hurricane Katrina was bearing down on the Gulf Coast 10 years ago, forecasters had a good idea of where the storm would hit and how intense it would be. What was unexpected was how much flooding the hurricane would cause when it reached southeast Louisiana. Play Video The Difference Between a Typhoon and a Hurricane It's among the strongest storms ever recorded on the planet. Super Typhoon Haiyan slammed into the Philippines with winds touching 235 miles per hour. Scientists now know that in the 24 hours between the last Hurricane Hunters reconnaissance flights and the time the storm made landfall, an upper-level shear knocked the eyewall over, causing winds to spread out horizontally and setting the stage for a huge spike in water levels. More than 1,800 people died in the storm and flooding.   More
(Source: Discovery News - Aug 22)


ARIANE 5 ROCKET LIFTS OFF WITH TWO COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES ARIANE 5 ROCKET LIFTS OFF WITH TWO COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES - Arianespace successfully sent two communications satellites into space on Thursday, Aug. 20, using the company's Ariane 5 heavy launcher. Liftoff occurred at 4:34 p.m. EDT (5:34 local time; 20:34 GMT) from the Ariane Launch Complex No. 3 (ELA 3) at the Europe's spaceport located in Kourou, French Guiana. Today was Arianespace's 225th mission to date in the company's history (VA225). It delivered the EUTELSAT 8 West B and Intelsat 34 comsats into a geostationary transfer orbit (GTO). The 180 ft. (55.9 m) tall rocket, during the first phase of the ascent, was powered by the Vulcain 2 main engine of the Core Stage and the two Solid Rocket Boosters which burned for two minutes and 24 seconds before separating from the launch vehicle. Then, the Vulcain 2 engine alone powered the vehicle will until the separation of the Payload Fairing three minutes and 21 seconds into the flight.   More
(Source: SpaceFlight Insider - Aug 21)


ISRO'S GSAT-6 SATELLITE LAUNCH SCHEDULED FOR AUGUST 27 ISRO'S GSAT-6 SATELLITE LAUNCH SCHEDULED FOR AUGUST 27 - The launch of Geo-synchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) D6 carrying India's latest communication satellite GSAT-6 is scheduled for August 27, Indian Space Research Organisation said today. The launch of GSLV-D6 carrying GSAT-6 is scheduled at 1652 hours from Satish Dhawan Space Centre at Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh, ISRO said. ISRO chairman A S Kiran Kumar had earlier said that the satellite would be for strategic application. "It will give you a capability with very small hand held device to communicate, so like a small mobile you can communicate directly through the satellite to any other part, because the antenna size is very large, so it has got a signal grasping power much larger," he had said.    More
(Source: Economic Times - Aug 20)


HISTORIC CHINA PAYLOAD TO FLY ON INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION HISTORIC CHINA PAYLOAD TO FLY ON INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION - NanoRacks, a Houston-based aerospace company, will fly the first Chinese commercial payload to the International Space Station. The company will partner with scientists from the Beijing Institute of Technology to study the effects of microgravity on DNA. This comes as no small feat given that China has been accused of hacking U.S. government agencies and pursuing a policy of military space dominance during the two years it took to negotiate the deal. Chinese scientists have been involved in NASA projects in the past, notably the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, which was attached to the International Space Station during the final space shuttle mission. But a 2011 budgetary stipulation known as the Wolf Amendment has precluded NASA from cooperating with China or any Chinese-owned company on new space-related endeavors until the People's Republic improves its human rights record and reduces espionage efforts against the U.S.    More
(Source: Fox News - Aug 20)



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