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CROWDED SPACE STATION: THERE ARE 9 PEOPLE FROM 4 DIFFERENT SPACE AGENCIES IN ORBIT RIGHT NOW - It's a busy week at the International Space Station (ISS). With nine crewmembers currently on board, the orbiting laboratory will be unusually crowded until Thursday (Oct. 3), when three of those crewmembers are scheduled to return to Earth.
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SATELLITE NEWS

EPIC SPACE TIME-LAPSE CAPTURED FROM INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION EPIC SPACE TIME-LAPSE CAPTURED FROM INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION - A stunning time-lapse captured by the International Space Station shows the Earth, stars and even events like thunderstorms and wildfires. The time-lapse was created from a total of 400 photographs over the course of 11 minutes as the ISS traveled from Namibia toward the Red Sea, according to NASA. NASA astronaut Christina Koch, who tweets about her experiences on the International Space Station and recently partook in the first all-women spacewalk, captured the images.   More
(Source: Fox News - Oct 23)


ROCKET LAB AIMS TO DELIVER SMALL SATELLITES TO THE MOON AND BEYOND ROCKET LAB AIMS TO DELIVER SMALL SATELLITES TO THE MOON AND BEYOND - Rocket Lab kicked off the International Astronautical Congress with the news that it’ll begin offering small satellite delivery service to orbits beyond low Earth orbit, where it currently operates — including delivering payloads all the way to the Moon. The longer-range service will be provided via its Photon spacecraft, which it’ll pair with a new additional stage to add range to the vehicle. The company expects to be able to begin serving customers with this new combined, longer range spacecraft possibly as early as Q4 2020.   More
(Source: TechCrunch - Oct 23)


AIR FORCE REVIEWING BOEING’S BID FOR WGS-11, PROJECTS SATELLITE COULD BE READY IN FIVE YEARS AIR FORCE REVIEWING BOEING’S BID FOR WGS-11, PROJECTS SATELLITE COULD BE READY IN FIVE YEARS - The U.S. Air Force and Boeing are still negotiating the terms of a $605 million deal the company was awarded in April for the production of the 11th satellite of the Wideband Global Satellite Communication (WGS) constellation. The Air Force estimates the satellite could be ready for launch in about five years if an agreement is reached soon. One of the sticking points is the use of WGS-11 as a platform for hosted payloads.   More
(Source: SpaceNews - Oct 21)


LONG MARCH 3B LAUNCHES TJSW-4 LONG MARCH 3B LAUNCHES TJSW-4 - China launched another secretive Tongxin Jishu Shiyan Weixing (TJSW -4) satellite on October 17. The launch took place at 15:21 UTC using the Long March-3B/G2 (Y57) ‘Chang Zheng-3B/G2’ launch vehicle from the LC3 launch complex. As with the previous launch of Communications Engineering Test Satellites, there is not much information regarding the satellite. When TJSW-1 was launched on September 12, 2015, Chinese authorities said then that the new satellite was a geostationary communications technology test satellite to be mainly used to conduct a test on Ka-band in broadband communication (frequencies between 27 and 40 GHz).   More
(Source: NASASpaceFlight.com - Oct 20)


KOCH, MEIR CONCLUDE FIRST ALL-FEMALE SPACEWALK KOCH, MEIR CONCLUDE FIRST ALL-FEMALE SPACEWALK - Astronauts Christina Koch and Jessica Meir carried out history’s first all-female spacewalk Friday, floating outside the International Space Station and successfully installing a 230-pound replacement battery charger in the lab’s solar power system. The historic excursion was carried out in a blaze of public interest that rose all the way to the White House.   More
(Source: SpaceFlight Now - Oct 20)


SPACEX MAY WANT TO LAUNCH 42,000 INTERNET SATELLITES — ABOUT 5 TIMES MORE SPACECRAFT THAN HUMANITY HAS EVER FLOWN SPACEX MAY WANT TO LAUNCH 42,000 INTERNET SATELLITES — ABOUT 5 TIMES MORE SPACECRAFT THAN HUMANITY HAS EVER FLOWN - If SpaceX gets the go-ahead, the company's planned fleet of Starlink internet satellites could soon outnumber all the spacecraft humanity has ever launched by nearly five-to-one. That's according to Caleb Henry at Space News, who on Tuesday reported that SpaceX, founded by tech mogul Elon Musk, now seeks permission from the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) to fly an additional 30,000 Starlink satellites into space. Those tens of thousands would be additional to the nearly 12,000 spacecraft that SpaceX asked permission to launch from the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC).   More
(Source: Business Insider - Oct 19)


WHAT'S IT LIKE TO LIVE ON THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION? WHAT'S IT LIKE TO LIVE ON THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION? - When it comes to business travel, astronauts take the cake. The six space scientists and engineers who live and work in the International Space Station are traveling at a speed of five miles per second -- orbiting Earth once every 92 minutes. As far as we know, they don't earn frequent flyer miles, but they do get to spend an average of six months living and working with a multinational crew in what's arguably the coolest office in the solar system.    More
(Source: CNN - Oct 19)


SWARM GETS GREEN LIGHT FROM FCC FOR ITS 150-SATELLITE CONSTELLATION SWARM GETS GREEN LIGHT FROM FCC FOR ITS 150-SATELLITE CONSTELLATION - Swarm Technologies aims to connect smart devices around the world with a low-bandwidth but ever-present network provided by satellites — and it just got approval from the FCC to do so. Apparently the agency is no longer worried that Swarm’s sandwich-sized satellites are too small to be tracked. The company’s SpaceBEE satellites are tiny things that will provide a connection to devices that might otherwise be a pain to get online. Think soil monitors in the middle of corn fields, or buoys in the middle of the ocean.    More
(Source: TechCrunch - Oct 18)


DREAM CHASER STRUCTURE ARRIVES AT FACTORY FOR OUTFITTING DREAM CHASER STRUCTURE ARRIVES AT FACTORY FOR OUTFITTING - The composite structure of Sierra Nevada Corp.’s first space-rated Dream Chaser space plane has arrived at the company’s Colorado factory for integration with computers, a heat shield and mechanical systems before launch to the International Space Station in late 2021.   More
(Source: SpaceFlight Now - Oct 18)


PREPARING FOR CHINA'S HOMEGROWN SPACE STATION PREPARING FOR CHINA'S HOMEGROWN SPACE STATION - China is preparing for upcoming frequent space missions to construct China’s space station and the Long March-5B carrier rocket, set to launch capsules for the space station, is expected to make its maiden flight in 2020. Zhou Jianping, an academic of the Chinese Academy of Engineering, has been appointed chief designer of China’s manned space program, and Gu Yidong, an academic of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, has been appointed chief space scientist of the program, according to the China Manned Space Agency.   More
(Source: Shine News - Oct 18)


ROCKET LAB DELIVERS ON DEDICATED LAUNCH FOR ASTRO DIGITAL ROCKET LAB DELIVERS ON DEDICATED LAUNCH FOR ASTRO DIGITAL - A technology demonstration microsatellite for Astro Digital rode a Rocket Lab Electron launcher into orbit Wednesday (U.S. time) from New Zealand, setting the stage for the debut of new systems on the next Electron flight as engineers move closer to retrieving and reusing the rocket’s first stage. The 55-foot-tall (17-meter) Electron rocket fired nine Rutherford engines with nearly 50,000 pounds of thrust at 9:22 p.m. EDT Wednesday (0122 GMT Thursday) to climb off its launch pad on Mahia Peninsula, the home of Rocket Lab’s privately-run spaceport on on New Zealand’s North Island.   More
(Source: SpaceFlight Now - Oct 17)


FIRST ALL-FEMALE SPACEWALK ON TAP FRIDAY TO REPLACE FAILED BATTERY CONTROLLER FIRST ALL-FEMALE SPACEWALK ON TAP FRIDAY TO REPLACE FAILED BATTERY CONTROLLER - First all-female spacewalk on tap Friday to replace failed battery controller By William Harwood Updated on: October 15, 2019 / 7:24 PM / CBS News Two NASA astronauts will take part in the first all-female spacewalk Friday, a critical outing to restore lost power in the wake of an equipment failure that cropped up after new batteries were installed in the International Space Station's solar power system during two recent spacewalks. Astronauts Christina Koch, making her fourth spacewalk, or EVA, and Jessica Meir, making her first, will float outside the station to remove a malfunctioning 19-year-old battery charge-discharge unit, or BCDU, on the far left end of the station's power truss and install a 232-pound replacement.   More
(Source: CBS News - Oct 16)


SPACEX SUBMITS PAPERWORK FOR 30,000 MORE STARLINK SATELLITES SPACEX SUBMITS PAPERWORK FOR 30,000 MORE STARLINK SATELLITES - SpaceX has asked the International Telecommunication Union to arrange spectrum for 30,000 additional Starlink satellites. SpaceX, which is already planning the world’s largest low-Earth-orbit broadband constellation by far, filed paperwork in recent weeks for up to 30,000 additional Starlink satellites on top of the 12,000 already approved by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission.   More
(Source: SpaceNews - Oct 16)


ROCKET LAB PREPS FOR COMMERCIAL SATELLITE LAUNCH THIS WEEK ROCKET LAB PREPS FOR COMMERCIAL SATELLITE LAUNCH THIS WEEK - Rocket Lab’s fifth flight of the year is set for liftoff as soon as Wednesday (U.S. time) carrying a small experimental satellite to orbit for Astro Digital, a Silicon Valley company aiming to demonstrate technologies in space after an earlier focus on Earth observation. The mission was delayed two days because of stormy weather at Rocket Lab’s launch site, located on Mahia Peninsula on New Zealand’s North Island.   More
(Source: SpaceFlight Now - Oct 16)


JAPANESE SATELLITE RE-ENTERS ATMOSPHERE AFTER EXPERIMENTS IN ULTRA-LOW ORBIT JAPANESE SATELLITE RE-ENTERS ATMOSPHERE AFTER EXPERIMENTS IN ULTRA-LOW ORBIT - An experimental Japanese satellite has ended its mission after proving it could operate at super-low altitudes, testing an Earth-imaging camera and using ion propulsion to fight against aerodynamic drag at an altitude of 112 miles (181 kilometers). The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s Tsubame satellite, named for the Japanese word for barn swallow, re-entered the atmosphere Oct. 2 after a nearly three-year mission.   More
(Source: SpaceFlight Now - Oct 16)


UC BERKELEY WAS ABOUT TO LAUNCH A SATELLITE. THEN PG&E SAID IT WAS CUTTING POWER UC BERKELEY WAS ABOUT TO LAUNCH A SATELLITE. THEN PG&E SAID IT WAS CUTTING POWER - Last Monday, just as the workday was winding down, Paula Milano received a phone call that threw her week into chaos. Milano, who helps run the Space Sciences Laboratory at UC Berkeley, had been gearing up for a satellite launch. But on the phone now was a friend of hers, with bad news: PG&E, the power company, was warning the school that its electricity could be cut Wednesday—making the campus one of more than 700,000 customers that would suffer the same fate. The outage was a precautionary measure to keep forecasted high winds from jostling electrical equipment and starting the next massive wildfire.    More
(Source: WIRED - Oct 16)


SCIENTISTS PROPOSE NEW SATELLITE TECH TO DODGE SPACE JUNK FROM MEGACONSTELLATIONS SCIENTISTS PROPOSE NEW SATELLITE TECH TO DODGE SPACE JUNK FROM MEGACONSTELLATIONS - If a disastrous space junk chain reaction ends up surrounding Earth with a belt of destructive shrapnel, state-of-the-art infrared cameras and gel-based rockets just might help future satellites dodge such debris, a new study finds. Space debris might not sound dangerous until one realizes that in low Earth orbit — up to about 1,200 miles (2,000 kilometers) in altitude — such debris collides with an average speed of about 22,370 mph (36,000 km/h), according to NASA. At such speeds, even tiny pieces of space debris can inflict devastating damage.   More
(Source: Space.com - Oct 15)


NEXT YEAR, NEW SPACE MISSIONS WILL TEST TECHNOLOGIES TO FIX BUSTED SATELLITES IN ORBIT NEXT YEAR, NEW SPACE MISSIONS WILL TEST TECHNOLOGIES TO FIX BUSTED SATELLITES IN ORBIT - Next year, the long-held dream of repairing satellites already in orbit around Earth will come a little closer to reality. Two new missions — from military contractor Northrop Grumman and a startup called Astroscale — will send spacecraft into orbit to rendezvous with other vehicles zooming around Earth to see if it’s possible for two satellites to delicately meet up with each other in space. If successful, these missions could mark a big first step toward cleaning up Earth orbit and making it a more sustainable place.   More
(Source: The Verge - Oct 15)


TINY MINNESOTA HIGH SCHOOL AIMS TO PUT A WASHING MACHINE IN OUTER SPACE TINY MINNESOTA HIGH SCHOOL AIMS TO PUT A WASHING MACHINE IN OUTER SPACE - A tiny high school in east central Minnesota with barely 200 students is turning out some of the world’s most advanced technology. An ethanol-fueled car that gets more than 500 miles per gallon? They’ve built that. A prosthetic foot that’s been used by the world’s top paralympic skiers? Built that, too. Now the tech students in this town of 1,800 some 60 miles north of the Twin Cities are working on a new project that’s out of this world — literally.   More
(Source: - Oct 15)


A SOVIET SATELLITE FALLS TO EARTH IN 'THE WALKING DEAD' SEASON 10. HOW REALISTIC IS IT? A SOVIET SATELLITE FALLS TO EARTH IN 'THE WALKING DEAD' SEASON 10. HOW REALISTIC IS IT? - AMC's "The Walking Dead" launched its tenth season last week to the delight of zombie fans everywhere, but the premiere also contained a space junk easter egg that just might be a major plot point for series: a Soviet satellite crashing to Earth. The episode "Lines We Cross" ends with an old Soviet satellite crashing to Earth as a brilliant daytime fireball. It looses unmistakable sonic booms and a sparks wildfire in enemy territory (watch out for Whisperers!) that the show's heroes must battle to save their hunting grounds.    More
(Source: Space.com - Oct 14)

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